Province tells N.S. business owners they applied for non-existent flood relief

The province has apologized to some compact small business proprietors in Bedford, N.S., who were being afflicted by July’s floods, soon after they applied to a relief system that was posted on the web in mistake.

The program called for applications from tiny enterprises who could not run thanks to the floods, saying they could be eligible for a just one-time grant of $2,500.

“This entire time I imagined any person was working on it,” reported John Connors, the operator of East Coastline Kicks, a sneaker shop in Bedford Place Shopping mall.

His retail outlet was inundated with up to 13 centimetres of h2o, leaving lots of substantial-end footwear destroyed. With losses approximated at much more than $150,000, Connors said he utilized to the plan in September.

Drinking water is proven on the floor of East Coastline Kicks in this image taken adhering to the flooding in Bedford. (East Coast Kicks)

He received a response on Monday — in the type of an electronic mail describing the error — after CBC News contacted the province to look at on the position of his and other applications.

“Kick us although we’re down, kind of mentality, with this one particular,” he stated.

Minister of Economic Development Susan Corkum-Greek said Thursday her office was looking at the risk of a likely method in reaction to the flooding when evaluating the problems across the province.

“Evidently an error took position and the web site remained energetic and we learned through thoughts from CBC that the page was there and in simple fact we learned 11 firms submitted purposes and that demonstrates an mistake and a extremely unlucky mistake,” Corkum-Greek stated.

Since the application in concern was not up and running when the facts ended up posted on-line, the division stated there was no way to notify employees of any purposes.

East Coast Kicks reopened on Nov. 4 immediately after going through substantial renovations, which include replacing the floor.

Connors stays in negotiations with his insurance policies firm about how significantly of the renovations and hurt will be protected.

‘It looks slapdash’

Ken Halef, who owns Pro Tailors in the exact shopping mall, was also remaining thinking what experienced occurred to his declare until eventually he acquired a comparable e-mail this 7 days.

“It just failed to appear very accountable of the governing administration,” explained manager Lyndsay Ambler, “just to sort of flip about and say, ‘Oh, that did not exist in any case, so sorry.'”

The relatives-owned tailor store and menswear store has operated for more than 40 decades and has endured one of its most tough intervals with the pandemic and the flood.

Each firms say the province must nonetheless shell out out the $2,500.

“We seriously truly feel they should provide that for the reason that it was out there. We did use for it and you know, it truly is variety of their miscalculation so we feel they really should honour it,” Ambler said.

Kelly Regan, the Liberal MLA for Bedford Basin, supports the idea.

“We are concerned about the lack of awareness to detail,” Regan stated, characterizing the province’s response to flooding in Bedford as insufficient.

“It looks slapdash. It appears to be like the gang that could not shoot straight,” Regan explained. “It just appears like beginner hour.”

NDP Leader Claudia Chender said honouring the payments would be a first step but said what took place warrants a further evaluation of the office. 

“This is a scenario of extreme mismanagement of the govt and I would hope this is the type of issue the auditor general will search at when it comes time to on the lookout at issues about that section,” Chender reported.

Province examining to see if businesses qualify for other aid

Corkum-Greek explained the province simply cannot pay the grant from the plan in issue due to the fact it was never funded.

“We could only make a payment centered on a method that is funded and this specific program was not introduced and it is not funded,” she said.

Having said that, Corkum-Greek stated her department is in speak to with the 11 impacted organizations and is wanting into whether they qualify for other financial assistance.

The final provincial guidance package deal announced on July 26, coated up to $200,000 in uninsurable losses for tiny firms.

Connors said he wasn’t eligible for that since his retail outlet has insurance plan.

“That $2,500 was in the back of my head the whole full time.”